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Michel Bauwens, and the Crisis of Value Theory

Once upone a time, Jeff Jarvis wrote the words "bits, not atoms", and sent me down a rabbit hole that I have yet to climb out of.

I've got a statement for you to chew on with me, written by Michel Bauwens:
1) The creation of non-monetary value is exponential
2) The monetization of such value is linear
Bauwens cited one of my posts over at the P2P Foundation's blog, and tripped off the usual technological alarms that send me scrambling for any mention of my name or writings. I'm rattled by how big this man thinks, and that he'd bother to cite my writings on what I had been calling "innovation deflation."

Bauwens' post sent me off to his "Recapitulating the Crisis of Value Theory" article, where I found the statements at the top of this entry. It is a profoundly formal definition of the ideas that I was toying with when talking about innovation, efficiency, and deflation.

I don't have a great deal to say in this post (yet), but I've only begun to wrestle with Bauwens' theory, and I thought it deserved more than a Tweet. I just know that I'm going to have to come back to it, and I needed to give it a permanent home on this blog to anchor my thoughts.

Give him a read. Share your thoughts.


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