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Maureen Dowd. Twit? You Decide.

Maureen Dowd follows the litany of professional chattering class members thumbing their noses at Twitter.

In an oh-so-clever twist, she interviews Biz Stone and Evan Williams, creators of Twitter, in a format that allows for only 140 characters in the questions or answers. (She even used the same title as one of my blog posts on the same subject, which probably means I wasn't being clever enough.) It's one of her more insipid articles, second only in recent memory to the article asking whether Michelle Obama should stop showing off her biceps.

Why did you think the answer to e-mail was a new kind of e-mail?


Fritinancy gives an excellent sendup of Ms. Dowd's article, rewriting it was if Dowd was interviewing Alexander Graham Bell.

Why did you think the answer to telegrams was a noisy new telegram?


Read Maureen Dowd, then read Fritinancy. Too good.

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