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Wine Country Vacation - Monday

Today we had two objectives. 1) To eat lunch at Coppola's newly redone Rustic, and 2) to round out my case of wines I was bringing back.

Coppola's Rustic, formerly Russo & Bianco, formerly Chateau Souverain. They remodeled and took the castle towers down, so the place doesn't look like the Bastille anymore. 


The interior dining area is entirely new

This view hasn't changed, thank God. This is table #81. Ask for it.

Fearless Leader! He'll probably ask me to take this picture down as well. 

Chris (and our waitress. Oops)

Trouble.

Some knick knacks that Coppola had laying around. :-)



The tasting room. This is the only place on earth that has more bottles of Coppola's Claret than my recycle bin.

Stepping out of the elevator to get down the hillside is a lot like entering a Holodeck when the doors open. I know, I'm a nerd.

The vinyards at UNTI. God, I love this winery's stuff. 

The Barrel/Tasting room at UNTI

My favorite winery in all of California. Taldeschi.

In the tasting room Dan Taldeschi was signing bottles for some event. I insisted I wouldn't but anything that wasn't signed after that. He obliged. :-)

That's all! I'm packed up and heading back to San Francisco shortly to catch my flight back home to Detroit: City of Tomorrow[tm]. It's been a great trip with excellent food, wine, and company. That being said, 10 days is a long time to be away from home, and tonight I get to sleep in my own bed. I can't wait.

Comments

  1. Great pictures and post - I'll have to check out Taldeschi's next time I venture to the wine country. I'm glad you enjoyed your visit to CA and shared some of your experiences with us!

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